Contaminant Release from Storm Water Culvert Rehabilitation Technologies: Understanding Implications to the Environment and Long-Term Material Integrity

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General Information
Study Number: TPF-5(339)
Lead Organization: Virginia Department of Transportation
Solicitation Number: 1399
Partners: CA, KS, NC, NY, OH, VA
Contractor(s): Purdue University
Status: Closed
Est. Completion Date:
Contract/Other Number:
Last Updated: Oct 15, 2020
Contract End Date:
Financial Summary
Contract Amount:
Total Commitments Received: $630,000.00
100% SP&R Approval: Approved
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Bridget Donaldson
Bridget.Donaldson@VDOT.Virginia.gov
Phone: 434-293-1922
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Susan Jones
susan.jones@dot.gov
Phone: 202- 493-2139
Organization Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
California Department of Transportation 2016 $35,000.00 Akber Ali Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
California Department of Transportation 2017 $35,000.00 Akber Ali Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
California Department of Transportation 2018 $35,000.00 Akber Ali Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
Kansas Department of Transportation 2016 $35,000.00 Aaron Boehmler David Behzadpour 785-291-3847 David.Behzadpour@ks.gov
Kansas Department of Transportation 2017 $35,000.00 Aaron Boehmler David Behzadpour 785-291-3847 David.Behzadpour@ks.gov
Kansas Department of Transportation 2018 $35,000.00 Aaron Boehmler David Behzadpour 785-291-3847 David.Behzadpour@ks.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2016 $35,000.00 Mark Saunders Wes Yang 518-457-4660 wes.yang@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2017 $35,000.00 Mark Saunders Wes Yang 518-457-4660 wes.yang@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2018 $35,000.00 Mark Saunders Wes Yang 518-457-4660 wes.yang@dot.ny.gov
North Carolina Department of Transportation 2016 $35,000.00 Matt Lauffer Neil Mastin 919 707 6661 jmastin@ncdot.gov
North Carolina Department of Transportation 2017 $35,000.00 Matt Lauffer Neil Mastin 919 707 6661 jmastin@ncdot.gov
North Carolina Department of Transportation 2018 $35,000.00 Matt Lauffer Neil Mastin 919 707 6661 jmastin@ncdot.gov
Ohio Department of Transportation 2016 $35,000.00 Jeffrey Syar Cynthia Jones 614-466-1975 cynthia.jones@dot.ohio.gov
Ohio Department of Transportation 2017 $70,000.00 Jeffrey Syar Cynthia Jones 614-466-1975 cynthia.jones@dot.ohio.gov
Ohio Department of Transportation 2018 $0.00 Jeffrey Syar Cynthia Jones 614-466-1975 cynthia.jones@dot.ohio.gov
Virginia Department of Transportation 2016 $35,000.00 Bridget Donaldson Bill Kelsh 434-293-1934 Bill.Kelsh@VDOT.Virginia.gov
Virginia Department of Transportation 2017 $35,000.00 Bridget Donaldson Bill Kelsh 434-293-1934 Bill.Kelsh@VDOT.Virginia.gov
Virginia Department of Transportation 2018 $35,000.00 Bridget Donaldson Bill Kelsh 434-293-1934 Bill.Kelsh@VDOT.Virginia.gov

Study Description

Storm water culverts are critical roadway safety assets which divert water from thoroughfares. In the next five years alone, more than $3.6 trillion must be invested in U.S. transportation infrastructure. Annually, DOTs install more than 12 million feet of storm water culverts and more than 1 million existing culverts require repair. Aging culverts pose several risks because unexpected failures can cause traffic disruption, environmental and property damages, and loss of life.

Aged culverts are increasingly being rehabilitated using in-situ methods, where advanced polymeric materials such as spray-on coatings and cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) lining processes are created and installed in the field. CIPP is considered the most widely used trenchless pipeline rehabilitation method in the world, and has become a common method for rehabilitating storm water culverts maintained by DOTs. In-situ methods are attractive because they avoid open-trench excavation, traffic disruption, and work zone safety issues.

Today, DOTs face two major culvert rehabilitation challenges due to the absence of data.

First, studies by a subset of DOTs have discovered that the installation of advanced polymeric materials such as spray-on coatings and cured-in-place lining (CIPP) processes can release toxic chemicals into the water conveyed by the culverts. Fish kills from CIPP projects have been documented in the U.S. and Canada. Numerous additional anecdotal accounts from the U.S and other countries have been reported regarding adverse effects to the environment and wastewater facilities. While several DOTs have moved to upgrade their specifications, the performance of individual specification construction controls remains unknown. DOTs do not have the information needed to select from a field-validated set of culvert rehabilitation construction controls. Moreover, DOTs cannot strategically identify construction controls for culvert rehabilitation technologies that enter the marketplace in the future.

Second, DOTs lack information on the degree that chemical leaching affects polymeric material long-term structural performance. Recent studies have shown some of the chemicals released into the environment by culvert rehabilitation polymeric materials are product ingredients intended to promote material strength and durability. Evidence from other polymeric material - water infrastructure applications clearly demonstrates that polymer composition is largely responsible for material longevity. The impact of losing these compounds on the long-term performance of culvert rehabilitation materials remains unknown. DOTs need information on how newly installed polymeric materials age in storm water applications, particularly when some degree of chemical leaching occurs.

Objectives

The primary project objectives are to determine the following:

(1) The scope of the problem across DOTs (i.e., the extent of use of these technologies and the scale of their impacts to water quality);

(2)The effectiveness of existing construction specifications at minimizing contaminant release from rehabilitated culverts; and

(3) The degree to which the structural integrity and longevity of rehabilitated culverts are compromised by chemical leaching.

Results of this project will enable DOTs to make informed decisions with regard to culvert rehabilitation selection and specification development.

Scope of Work

(1) Survey state DOTs to determine (1) proportion of projects using technologies with polymer components (i.e., CIPP, coatings, liners, polymer-enhanced materials) and (2) document any construction specifications in place for these methods.

(2) Conduct water quality testing from culvert rehabilitation sites in multiple states to determine implications to the aquatic environment and the effectiveness of any existing specifications.

(3) Determine the relationship between chemical leaching, decreased liner structural integrity, and longevity through laboratory accelerated aging tests and analyses of exhumed materials from the field.

(4) Use the findings from this study to provide DOTs two forms of guidance: (1) a final report that will include recommended construction specifications to minimize environmental impacts and maximize performance, and (2) a hands-on training workshop about current and emerging culvert rehabilitation technologies, specification considerations, and factors to consider for environmental and structural performance.

Comments

Recommended funding $560000; Performance Period 3 years; Suggested contribution per partner: $35,000/yr for three years

Documents Attached
Title File/Link Type Privacy Download
Final Report - TPF-5(339) Final Report - 6 State Lining Study (2019).pdf Final Report Public
Approved waiver memo Approval of SP&R Waiver Solicitation#1399.pdf Memorandum Public
Lead State Acceptance Memo TPF-5(339) Lead State Acceptance Memo TPF-5(339).pdf Memorandum Public
Closeout Memo TPF-5(339) Closeout Memo.signed.pdf Memorandum Public
Waiver Request Waiver Request Concurrence Div Office.pdf Other Public
TFP Quarterly Progress Report - Jan to Mar 2016 TPF Quarterly Report Form_Jan to Mar 2016.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TFP Quarterly Progress Report April to June 2016 VDOT TPF Quarterly Report Form_Apr 1-Jun30 2016.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress Report July to September 2016 Quarterly Progress Report Oct 2016.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress Report Oct to December 2016 TPF Quarterly Report Form_Oct to Dec 2016.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quartery Progress Report Jan to Mar 2017 Quarterly Progress Report Oct 2016.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress Report Apr to Jun 2017 TPF Quarterly Report Form_Apr 1-Jun30 2017.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress report Jul to Sep 2017 TPF Quarterly Report Form_Jul 1-Sep30 2017.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress report Oct to Dec 2017 VDOT Progress Report Jan2018.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress report Jan to Mar 2018 TPF Quarterly Report Form_Jan to Mar 2018.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress Report Apr to Jun 2018 TPF Quarterly Report Form_Apr to Jun 2018.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress Report Jul to Sep 2018 TPF Quarterly Report Form_July to Sept 2018.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress Report Jan to Mar 2019 TPF Quarterly Report Form_Jan to Mar 2019.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public

Contaminant Release from Storm Water Culvert Rehabilitation Technologies: Understanding Implications to the Environment and Long-Term Material Integrity

General Information
Study Number: TPF-5(339)
Lead Organization: Virginia Department of Transportation
Solicitation Number: 1399
Partners: CA, KS, NC, NY, OH, VA
Contractor(s): Purdue University
Status: Closed
Est. Completion Date:
Contract/Other Number:
Last Updated: Oct 15, 2020
Contract End Date:
Financial Summary
Contract Amount:
Total Commitments Received: $630,000.00
100% SP&R Approval:
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Bridget Donaldson
Bridget.Donaldson@VDOT.Virginia.gov
Phone: 434-293-1922
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Susan Jones
susan.jones@dot.gov
Phone: 202- 493-2139
Commitments by Organizations
Organization Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
California Department of Transportation 2016 $35,000.00 Akber Ali Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
California Department of Transportation 2017 $35,000.00 Akber Ali Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
California Department of Transportation 2018 $35,000.00 Akber Ali Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
Kansas Department of Transportation 2016 $35,000.00 Aaron Boehmler David Behzadpour 785-291-3847 David.Behzadpour@ks.gov
Kansas Department of Transportation 2017 $35,000.00 Aaron Boehmler David Behzadpour 785-291-3847 David.Behzadpour@ks.gov
Kansas Department of Transportation 2018 $35,000.00 Aaron Boehmler David Behzadpour 785-291-3847 David.Behzadpour@ks.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2016 $35,000.00 Mark Saunders Wes Yang 518-457-4660 wes.yang@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2017 $35,000.00 Mark Saunders Wes Yang 518-457-4660 wes.yang@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2018 $35,000.00 Mark Saunders Wes Yang 518-457-4660 wes.yang@dot.ny.gov
North Carolina Department of Transportation 2016 $35,000.00 Matt Lauffer Neil Mastin 919 707 6661 jmastin@ncdot.gov
North Carolina Department of Transportation 2017 $35,000.00 Matt Lauffer Neil Mastin 919 707 6661 jmastin@ncdot.gov
North Carolina Department of Transportation 2018 $35,000.00 Matt Lauffer Neil Mastin 919 707 6661 jmastin@ncdot.gov
Ohio Department of Transportation 2016 $35,000.00 Jeffrey Syar Cynthia Jones 614-466-1975 cynthia.jones@dot.ohio.gov
Ohio Department of Transportation 2017 $70,000.00 Jeffrey Syar Cynthia Jones 614-466-1975 cynthia.jones@dot.ohio.gov
Ohio Department of Transportation 2018 $0.00 Jeffrey Syar Cynthia Jones 614-466-1975 cynthia.jones@dot.ohio.gov
Virginia Department of Transportation 2016 $35,000.00 Bridget Donaldson Bill Kelsh 434-293-1934 Bill.Kelsh@VDOT.Virginia.gov
Virginia Department of Transportation 2017 $35,000.00 Bridget Donaldson Bill Kelsh 434-293-1934 Bill.Kelsh@VDOT.Virginia.gov
Virginia Department of Transportation 2018 $35,000.00 Bridget Donaldson Bill Kelsh 434-293-1934 Bill.Kelsh@VDOT.Virginia.gov

Study Description

Study Description

Storm water culverts are critical roadway safety assets which divert water from thoroughfares. In the next five years alone, more than $3.6 trillion must be invested in U.S. transportation infrastructure. Annually, DOTs install more than 12 million feet of storm water culverts and more than 1 million existing culverts require repair. Aging culverts pose several risks because unexpected failures can cause traffic disruption, environmental and property damages, and loss of life.

Aged culverts are increasingly being rehabilitated using in-situ methods, where advanced polymeric materials such as spray-on coatings and cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) lining processes are created and installed in the field. CIPP is considered the most widely used trenchless pipeline rehabilitation method in the world, and has become a common method for rehabilitating storm water culverts maintained by DOTs. In-situ methods are attractive because they avoid open-trench excavation, traffic disruption, and work zone safety issues.

Today, DOTs face two major culvert rehabilitation challenges due to the absence of data.

First, studies by a subset of DOTs have discovered that the installation of advanced polymeric materials such as spray-on coatings and cured-in-place lining (CIPP) processes can release toxic chemicals into the water conveyed by the culverts. Fish kills from CIPP projects have been documented in the U.S. and Canada. Numerous additional anecdotal accounts from the U.S and other countries have been reported regarding adverse effects to the environment and wastewater facilities. While several DOTs have moved to upgrade their specifications, the performance of individual specification construction controls remains unknown. DOTs do not have the information needed to select from a field-validated set of culvert rehabilitation construction controls. Moreover, DOTs cannot strategically identify construction controls for culvert rehabilitation technologies that enter the marketplace in the future.

Second, DOTs lack information on the degree that chemical leaching affects polymeric material long-term structural performance. Recent studies have shown some of the chemicals released into the environment by culvert rehabilitation polymeric materials are product ingredients intended to promote material strength and durability. Evidence from other polymeric material - water infrastructure applications clearly demonstrates that polymer composition is largely responsible for material longevity. The impact of losing these compounds on the long-term performance of culvert rehabilitation materials remains unknown. DOTs need information on how newly installed polymeric materials age in storm water applications, particularly when some degree of chemical leaching occurs.

Objectives

The primary project objectives are to determine the following:

(1) The scope of the problem across DOTs (i.e., the extent of use of these technologies and the scale of their impacts to water quality);

(2)The effectiveness of existing construction specifications at minimizing contaminant release from rehabilitated culverts; and

(3) The degree to which the structural integrity and longevity of rehabilitated culverts are compromised by chemical leaching.

Results of this project will enable DOTs to make informed decisions with regard to culvert rehabilitation selection and specification development.

Scope of Work

(1) Survey state DOTs to determine (1) proportion of projects using technologies with polymer components (i.e., CIPP, coatings, liners, polymer-enhanced materials) and (2) document any construction specifications in place for these methods.

(2) Conduct water quality testing from culvert rehabilitation sites in multiple states to determine implications to the aquatic environment and the effectiveness of any existing specifications.

(3) Determine the relationship between chemical leaching, decreased liner structural integrity, and longevity through laboratory accelerated aging tests and analyses of exhumed materials from the field.

(4) Use the findings from this study to provide DOTs two forms of guidance: (1) a final report that will include recommended construction specifications to minimize environmental impacts and maximize performance, and (2) a hands-on training workshop about current and emerging culvert rehabilitation technologies, specification considerations, and factors to consider for environmental and structural performance.

Comments

Recommended funding $560000; Performance Period 3 years; Suggested contribution per partner: $35,000/yr for three years

Title File/Link Type Private
Final Report - TPF-5(339) Final Report - 6 State Lining Study (2019).pdf Final Report Public
Approved waiver memo Approval of SP&R Waiver Solicitation#1399.pdf Memorandum Public
Lead State Acceptance Memo TPF-5(339) Lead State Acceptance Memo TPF-5(339).pdf Memorandum Public
Closeout Memo TPF-5(339) Closeout Memo.signed.pdf Memorandum Public
Waiver Request Waiver Request Concurrence Div Office.pdf Other Public
TFP Quarterly Progress Report - Jan to Mar 2016 TPF Quarterly Report Form_Jan to Mar 2016.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TFP Quarterly Progress Report April to June 2016 VDOT TPF Quarterly Report Form_Apr 1-Jun30 2016.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress Report July to September 2016 Quarterly Progress Report Oct 2016.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress Report Oct to December 2016 TPF Quarterly Report Form_Oct to Dec 2016.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quartery Progress Report Jan to Mar 2017 Quarterly Progress Report Oct 2016.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress Report Apr to Jun 2017 TPF Quarterly Report Form_Apr 1-Jun30 2017.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress report Jul to Sep 2017 TPF Quarterly Report Form_Jul 1-Sep30 2017.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress report Oct to Dec 2017 VDOT Progress Report Jan2018.pdf Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress report Jan to Mar 2018 TPF Quarterly Report Form_Jan to Mar 2018.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress Report Apr to Jun 2018 TPF Quarterly Report Form_Apr to Jun 2018.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress Report Jul to Sep 2018 TPF Quarterly Report Form_July to Sept 2018.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public
TPF Quarterly Progress Report Jan to Mar 2019 TPF Quarterly Report Form_Jan to Mar 2019.docx Quarterly Progress Report Public

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