Geocomposite Capillary Barrier Drain (GCBD) for Limiting Moisture Changes in Pavements: Product Application

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General Information
Solicitation Number: 928
Status: End Solicitation Phase
Date Posted: Mar 07, 2005
Last Updated: Mar 15, 2012
Solicitation Expires: Mar 07, 2006
Partners: MI, MN, NY
Lead Organization: Minnesota Department of Transportation
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2005
Commitment End Year: 2007
100% SP&R Approval: Approved
Commitments Required: $165,000.00
Commitments Received: $190,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Lisa Jansen
lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Imad Basheer
Imad.Basheer@fhwa.dot.gov
Phone: 202-493-3149
Organization Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
Michigan Department of Transportation 2006 $25,000.00 Michael Eacker Andre' Clover 517-749-9001 clovera@michigan.gov
Michigan Department of Transportation 2007 $45,000.00 Michael Eacker Andre' Clover 517-749-9001 clovera@michigan.gov
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2005 $35,000.00 not available Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2006 $35,000.00 not available Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
New York State Department of Transportation 2005 $25,000.00 Bob Burnett Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2006 $25,000.00 Bob Burnett Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov

Background

The problems associated with excessive moisture in pavement bases and subgrades are numerous and well known. Conventional drainage may not be wholly effective in reducing water-related problems (e.g., Christopher and McGuffey, 1997; Hall and Correa, 2003). Conventional drainage is designed for saturated conditions, however, most water movement near the surface occurs under unsaturated (partially saturated) conditions. Recent studies suggest that conventional drainage systems can only be understood if unsaturated flow principles are considered (Birgisson and Roberson, 2000; Stormont and Zhou, 2004).

The performance of GCBD systems has been evaluated in the laboratory and in a limited field test (in the Muddy Roads project sponsored by the Vermont Agency of Transportation). The next step in GCBD development is to document its drainage performance in a field scale pavement section and to obtain related mechanical performance indicators. Field scale testing includes conditions that are more realistic for the eventual deployment of the GCBD technology, including pavement cracks and variability in base course properties. Field scale testing should include a side-by-side comparison with a control section. In this way, the benefits of the GCBD can be clearly demonstrated.

Objectives

This project is geared toward implementing GCBD technology. A key objective of the project is to select the most effective transport layer for use in a prototype GCBD. A second objective of the project is incorporation of the prototype GCBD into a full-scale test section at the Minnesota Road Research Facility (MnROAD), a comprehensive pavement test track facility. In addition to demonstrating construction using the GCBD, measurements of GCBD test section performance, side-by-side with a control section will quantify its benefits. The final objective is development of design tools to aid in the design of the GCBD for specific climate, geometry, and soils.

Scope of Work

Utilizing a GCBD for pavement drainage explicitly targets and provides for unsaturated flow, and will result in greater drainage efficiency compared to conventional drainage, which is designed for saturated flow. With a GCBD, the base and subgrade will contain less water than a pavement without a GCBD at any point in time. This is important because the strength of both the base course and subgrade degrades with increased moisture, and ultimately reduces pavement structural durability. Thus, a GCBD will result in increased longevity of the pavement. Expected benefits of the GCBD include:

- Reduced equilibrium water content in base

- Prevent positive pore water pressures in base

- Prevent wetting of underlying subgrade due to infiltration

- Prevent capillary rise of water from subgrade into base

- Provide complementary separation and stabilization

This project will provide important information to state and local transportation engineers which will allow them to make informed decisions and improved pavement design. By pooling resources, agencies will be able to conduct more extensive studies across a greater range of conditions than could be done by a single agency with only its own funds.

Comments

The NCHRP-IDEA Program has already committed $100,000 (see attached PDF format work plan). We are seeking $165,000 in pooled funds to construct one pavement test section at the MnROAD research facility. Minnesota, New York, and Michigan have already expressed interest in participating. Our target and ultimate goal is to have five agencies participating at $25,000 per year for two years, yielding $250,000 for the construction of two test sections.

Subjects: Pavement Design, Management, and Performance

Documents Attached
Title File/Link Type Private Download
Geocomposite Capillary Barrier Drain (GCBD) for Limiting Moisture Changes in Pavements: Product Application 928.pdf Solicitation Public

Geocomposite Capillary Barrier Drain (GCBD) for Limiting Moisture Changes in Pavements: Product Application

General Information
Solicitation Number: 928
Status: End Solicitation Phase
Date Posted: Mar 07, 2005
Last Updated: Mar 15, 2012
Solicitation Expires: Mar 07, 2006
Partners: MI, MN, NY
Lead Organization: Minnesota Department of Transportation
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2005
Commitment End Year: 2007
100% SP&R Approval: Approved
Commitments Required: $165,000.00
Commitments Received: $190,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Lisa Jansen
lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Imad Basheer
Imad.Basheer@fhwa.dot.gov
Phone: 202-493-3149
Commitments by Organizations
Agency Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
Michigan Department of Transportation 2006 $25,000.00 Michael Eacker Andre' Clover 517-749-9001 clovera@michigan.gov
Michigan Department of Transportation 2007 $45,000.00 Michael Eacker Andre' Clover 517-749-9001 clovera@michigan.gov
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2005 $35,000.00 not available Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2006 $35,000.00 not available Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
New York State Department of Transportation 2005 $25,000.00 Bob Burnett Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2006 $25,000.00 Bob Burnett Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov

Background

The problems associated with excessive moisture in pavement bases and subgrades are numerous and well known. Conventional drainage may not be wholly effective in reducing water-related problems (e.g., Christopher and McGuffey, 1997; Hall and Correa, 2003). Conventional drainage is designed for saturated conditions, however, most water movement near the surface occurs under unsaturated (partially saturated) conditions. Recent studies suggest that conventional drainage systems can only be understood if unsaturated flow principles are considered (Birgisson and Roberson, 2000; Stormont and Zhou, 2004).

The performance of GCBD systems has been evaluated in the laboratory and in a limited field test (in the Muddy Roads project sponsored by the Vermont Agency of Transportation). The next step in GCBD development is to document its drainage performance in a field scale pavement section and to obtain related mechanical performance indicators. Field scale testing includes conditions that are more realistic for the eventual deployment of the GCBD technology, including pavement cracks and variability in base course properties. Field scale testing should include a side-by-side comparison with a control section. In this way, the benefits of the GCBD can be clearly demonstrated.

Objectives

This project is geared toward implementing GCBD technology. A key objective of the project is to select the most effective transport layer for use in a prototype GCBD. A second objective of the project is incorporation of the prototype GCBD into a full-scale test section at the Minnesota Road Research Facility (MnROAD), a comprehensive pavement test track facility. In addition to demonstrating construction using the GCBD, measurements of GCBD test section performance, side-by-side with a control section will quantify its benefits. The final objective is development of design tools to aid in the design of the GCBD for specific climate, geometry, and soils.

Scope of Work

Utilizing a GCBD for pavement drainage explicitly targets and provides for unsaturated flow, and will result in greater drainage efficiency compared to conventional drainage, which is designed for saturated flow. With a GCBD, the base and subgrade will contain less water than a pavement without a GCBD at any point in time. This is important because the strength of both the base course and subgrade degrades with increased moisture, and ultimately reduces pavement structural durability. Thus, a GCBD will result in increased longevity of the pavement. Expected benefits of the GCBD include:

- Reduced equilibrium water content in base

- Prevent positive pore water pressures in base

- Prevent wetting of underlying subgrade due to infiltration

- Prevent capillary rise of water from subgrade into base

- Provide complementary separation and stabilization

This project will provide important information to state and local transportation engineers which will allow them to make informed decisions and improved pavement design. By pooling resources, agencies will be able to conduct more extensive studies across a greater range of conditions than could be done by a single agency with only its own funds.

Comments

The NCHRP-IDEA Program has already committed $100,000 (see attached PDF format work plan). We are seeking $165,000 in pooled funds to construct one pavement test section at the MnROAD research facility. Minnesota, New York, and Michigan have already expressed interest in participating. Our target and ultimate goal is to have five agencies participating at $25,000 per year for two years, yielding $250,000 for the construction of two test sections.

Subjects: Pavement Design, Management, and Performance

Title Type Private
Geocomposite Capillary Barrier Drain (GCBD) for Limiting Moisture Changes in Pavements: Product Application Solicitation N

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