Evaluate Fiber-Optic Sensor System for Weigh-in-Motion

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General Information
Solicitation Number: 816
Status: Solicitation withdrawn
Date Posted: Sep 10, 2003
Last Updated: Feb 18, 2004
Solicitation Expires: Mar 31, 2004
Partners: KY, OH, TX
Lead Organization: Texas Department of Transportation
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2004
Commitment End Year: 2005
100% SP&R Approval: Approved
Commitments Required: $320,000.00
Commitments Received: $140,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Martha Norwood
MNorwood@dot.state.tx.us
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Deborah Walker
deborah.walker@dot.gov
Phone: 202-493-3068
Organization Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
Kentucky Transportation Cabinet 2004 $30,000.00 Marcie Mathews 502-564-3730 marcie.mathews@ky.gov
Ohio Department of Transportation 2005 $30,000.00 Steven Jessberger General Research 614-644-8135 Research@dot.state.oh.us
Texas Department of Transportation 2004 $40,000.00 Martha Norwood 512-465-7404 MNorwood@dot.state.tx.us
Texas Department of Transportation 2005 $40,000.00 Martha Norwood 512-465-7404 MNorwood@dot.state.tx.us

Background

There is an increasing demand at both the state and federal levels for accurate and cost-effective weigh-in-motion (WIM) systems. These systems are important to monitor traffic flow and for predicting degradation of roadways due to heavy trucks. They also have applications in Homeland Security. Currently available WIM equipment falls primarily into two categories: 1) high accuracy bending plates and load cells, which are expensive and require significant road closure time for installation; and 2)lower accuracy piezoelectric sensor-based WIM systems. Piezoelectric systems are significantly lower in cost and require much less road closure and installation time than the first catagory. However, piezoelectric sensors have an unpredictable and relatively short service life, along with other shortcomings. The success of recent and on-going evaluations of fiber-optic axle sensors by Tennessee, Alabama, Idaho, Oregon DOTs and toll authorities in Illinois, New York and California suggests that, with some modifications, fiber-optic sensors could be successful for WIM applications. Accuracies are anticipated to be better than piezoelectric systems, but costs should be similar.

Objectives

To investigate the accuracy and reliability of a fiber-optic sensor system for weigh-in-motion. The objectives will be met by conducting a literature search, contacting state partners to coordinate efforts, developing a test plan, conducting laboratory and field tests of proposed system and components, determining signal properties of the sensors, evaluating cost implications of a fiber-optic WIM system, and reporting findings to the sponsoring agencies.

Scope of Work

Researchers will evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of fiber-optic technology with respect to cost, ease of installation, pavement damage, calibration, accuracy, maintenance, service life, power supply needs, portability, and other relevant factors. The research will closely scrutinize the signals generated by fiber-optic sensors, evaluate signal consistency and degradation over time, and evaluate other longevity aspects. There is also a need to evaluate one or more electronic interface units and the appropriate presence detectors in addition to testing the fiber-optic sensor itself. Identifying viable presence detection that is reliable and less expensive than inductive loops is an important goal of this research. At least one of the participating states will also investigate the feasibility of alternative sources of energy such as solar and wind power.

Documents Attached
Title File/Link Type Private Download
Evaluate Fiber-Optic Sensor System for Weigh-in-Motion 816.pdf Solicitation Public

Evaluate Fiber-Optic Sensor System for Weigh-in-Motion

General Information
Solicitation Number: 816
Status: Solicitation withdrawn
Date Posted: Sep 10, 2003
Last Updated: Feb 18, 2004
Solicitation Expires: Mar 31, 2004
Partners: KY, OH, TX
Lead Organization: Texas Department of Transportation
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2004
Commitment End Year: 2005
100% SP&R Approval: Approved
Commitments Required: $320,000.00
Commitments Received: $140,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Martha Norwood
MNorwood@dot.state.tx.us
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Deborah Walker
deborah.walker@dot.gov
Phone: 202-493-3068
Commitments by Organizations
Agency Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
Kentucky Transportation Cabinet 2004 $30,000.00 Marcie Mathews 502-564-3730 marcie.mathews@ky.gov
Ohio Department of Transportation 2005 $30,000.00 Steven Jessberger General Research 614-644-8135 Research@dot.state.oh.us
Texas Department of Transportation 2004 $40,000.00 Martha Norwood 512-465-7404 MNorwood@dot.state.tx.us
Texas Department of Transportation 2005 $40,000.00 Martha Norwood 512-465-7404 MNorwood@dot.state.tx.us

Background

There is an increasing demand at both the state and federal levels for accurate and cost-effective weigh-in-motion (WIM) systems. These systems are important to monitor traffic flow and for predicting degradation of roadways due to heavy trucks. They also have applications in Homeland Security. Currently available WIM equipment falls primarily into two categories: 1) high accuracy bending plates and load cells, which are expensive and require significant road closure time for installation; and 2)lower accuracy piezoelectric sensor-based WIM systems. Piezoelectric systems are significantly lower in cost and require much less road closure and installation time than the first catagory. However, piezoelectric sensors have an unpredictable and relatively short service life, along with other shortcomings. The success of recent and on-going evaluations of fiber-optic axle sensors by Tennessee, Alabama, Idaho, Oregon DOTs and toll authorities in Illinois, New York and California suggests that, with some modifications, fiber-optic sensors could be successful for WIM applications. Accuracies are anticipated to be better than piezoelectric systems, but costs should be similar.

Objectives

To investigate the accuracy and reliability of a fiber-optic sensor system for weigh-in-motion. The objectives will be met by conducting a literature search, contacting state partners to coordinate efforts, developing a test plan, conducting laboratory and field tests of proposed system and components, determining signal properties of the sensors, evaluating cost implications of a fiber-optic WIM system, and reporting findings to the sponsoring agencies.

Scope of Work

Researchers will evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of fiber-optic technology with respect to cost, ease of installation, pavement damage, calibration, accuracy, maintenance, service life, power supply needs, portability, and other relevant factors. The research will closely scrutinize the signals generated by fiber-optic sensors, evaluate signal consistency and degradation over time, and evaluate other longevity aspects. There is also a need to evaluate one or more electronic interface units and the appropriate presence detectors in addition to testing the fiber-optic sensor itself. Identifying viable presence detection that is reliable and less expensive than inductive loops is an important goal of this research. At least one of the participating states will also investigate the feasibility of alternative sources of energy such as solar and wind power.

Title Type Private
Evaluate Fiber-Optic Sensor System for Weigh-in-Motion Solicitation N

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