Application of Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning for the Identification, Evaluation, and Management of Unstable Highway Slopes

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General Information
Solicitation Number: 1149
Status: End Solicitation Phase
Date Posted: Dec 27, 2006
Last Updated: Jun 12, 2018
Solicitation Expires: Sep 30, 2007
Partners: AZDOT, CA, CO, NHDOT, NY, PADOT, TN, TX
Lead Organization: Arizona Department of Transportation
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2007
Commitment End Year: 2009
100% SP&R Approval: Pending Approval
Commitments Required: $180,000.00
Commitments Received: $240,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Christ Dimitroplos
cdimitroplos@azdot.gov
Organization Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
Arizona Department of Transportation 2007 $15,000.00 Frank Darmiento Frank Darmiento 602- 712-3134 fdarmiento@azdot.gov
Arizona Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Frank Darmiento Frank Darmiento 602- 712-3134 fdarmiento@azdot.gov
California Department of Transportation 2007 $15,000.00 Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
California Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
Colorado Department of Transportation 2007 $15,000.00 Aziz Khan aziz.khan@state.co.us
Colorado Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Aziz Khan aziz.khan@state.co.us
New Hampshire Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Krystle Pelham Ann Scholz 603-271-1659 ann.scholz@dot.nh.gov
New Hampshire Department of Transportation 2009 $15,000.00 Krystle Pelham Ann Scholz 603-271-1659 ann.scholz@dot.nh.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2007 $15,000.00 Douglas Hadjin Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Douglas Hadjin Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov
Pennsylvania Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Brad Foltz Lisa Tarson (717) 705-2202 ltarson@pa.gov
Pennsylvania Department of Transportation 2009 $15,000.00 Brad Foltz Lisa Tarson (717) 705-2202 ltarson@pa.gov
Tennessee Department of Transportation 2007 $15,000.00 Stephanie Vincent Stephanie Vincent 615.741.2203 Stephanie.Vincent@tn.gov
Tennessee Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Stephanie Vincent Stephanie Vincent 615.741.2203 Stephanie.Vincent@tn.gov
Texas Department of Transportation 2007 $15,000.00 Marcus Galvan Ned Mattila 512-416-4727 ned.mattila@txdot.gov
Texas Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Marcus Galvan Ned Mattila 512-416-4727 ned.mattila@txdot.gov

Background

Despite the advantages of rockfall management systems, the identification, evaluation, and categorization of comparatively high-risk slopes remains a labor intensive task that is further complicated by the broad range of geologic conditions that influence rockfall hazards. In the past several years LIDAR has gained acceptance as a potentially valuable new technology for rock mass characterization. In that period of time the LIDAR hardware has improved, automated point cloud processing software has been developed specifically for rock mass characterization, and best practices are starting to be developed for field scanning and 3D data processing. However, there are several issues that still need to be addressed. These include:

· Lack of documented, and fully qualified, procedures for data acquisition to ensure accuracy and ¿fitness for purpose¿ of the terrestrial LIDAR data.

· Terrestrial LIDAR produces very large 3D ¿clouds of points¿ that are visually interesting but not immediately analyzable by traditional software products.

Objectives

This study will focus on the development and application of three-dimensional terrestrial LIDAR (Light Detecting And Ranging) technology for geotechnical applications affecting the construction and maintenance of highways. The objectives include:

a. Using three-dimensional information from a LIDAR survey to estimate dimensions and volumes at a site.

b. Using LIDAR surveys for rock mass site characterization.

c. Using successive LIDAR scans along with "change detection" algorithms to determine the location and rates of rockfall events at a site.

Scope of Work

1. Evaluate and assess the recommended field procedure for the scanning and rescanning of highway rock cuts developed by the currently funded FHWA study.

2. Field-test procedures and algorithms for the processing of laser scan data (point clouds) developed by the current Federal Highway Administration and National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) IDEA projects.

3. Evaluate the Integration of laser-scanned data into Rockfall Hazard Rating Systems.

4. Facilitate widespread systematic use of laser-scanned data by state transportation agencies.

5. Produce a draft ¿Recommended Practice¿ document for submission to and review by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation officials (AASHTO).

Comments

Minimum state commitment is $30,000 over two years ($15,000 per year)

No document attached.

Application of Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning for the Identification, Evaluation, and Management of Unstable Highway Slopes

General Information
Solicitation Number: 1149
Status: End Solicitation Phase
Date Posted: Dec 27, 2006
Last Updated: Jun 12, 2018
Solicitation Expires: Sep 30, 2007
Partners: AZDOT, CA, CO, NHDOT, NY, PADOT, TN, TX
Lead Organization: Arizona Department of Transportation
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2007
Commitment End Year: 2009
100% SP&R Approval: Pending Approval
Commitments Required: $180,000.00
Commitments Received: $240,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Christ Dimitroplos
cdimitroplos@azdot.gov
Commitments by Organizations
Agency Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
Arizona Department of Transportation 2007 $15,000.00 Frank Darmiento Frank Darmiento 602- 712-3134 fdarmiento@azdot.gov
Arizona Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Frank Darmiento Frank Darmiento 602- 712-3134 fdarmiento@azdot.gov
California Department of Transportation 2007 $15,000.00 Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
California Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
Colorado Department of Transportation 2007 $15,000.00 Aziz Khan aziz.khan@state.co.us
Colorado Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Aziz Khan aziz.khan@state.co.us
New Hampshire Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Krystle Pelham Ann Scholz 603-271-1659 ann.scholz@dot.nh.gov
New Hampshire Department of Transportation 2009 $15,000.00 Krystle Pelham Ann Scholz 603-271-1659 ann.scholz@dot.nh.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2007 $15,000.00 Douglas Hadjin Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov
New York State Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Douglas Hadjin Gary Frederick 518-457-4645 gary.frederick@dot.ny.gov
Pennsylvania Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Brad Foltz Lisa Tarson (717) 705-2202 ltarson@pa.gov
Pennsylvania Department of Transportation 2009 $15,000.00 Brad Foltz Lisa Tarson (717) 705-2202 ltarson@pa.gov
Tennessee Department of Transportation 2007 $15,000.00 Stephanie Vincent Stephanie Vincent 615.741.2203 Stephanie.Vincent@tn.gov
Tennessee Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Stephanie Vincent Stephanie Vincent 615.741.2203 Stephanie.Vincent@tn.gov
Texas Department of Transportation 2007 $15,000.00 Marcus Galvan Ned Mattila 512-416-4727 ned.mattila@txdot.gov
Texas Department of Transportation 2008 $15,000.00 Marcus Galvan Ned Mattila 512-416-4727 ned.mattila@txdot.gov

Background

Despite the advantages of rockfall management systems, the identification, evaluation, and categorization of comparatively high-risk slopes remains a labor intensive task that is further complicated by the broad range of geologic conditions that influence rockfall hazards. In the past several years LIDAR has gained acceptance as a potentially valuable new technology for rock mass characterization. In that period of time the LIDAR hardware has improved, automated point cloud processing software has been developed specifically for rock mass characterization, and best practices are starting to be developed for field scanning and 3D data processing. However, there are several issues that still need to be addressed. These include:

· Lack of documented, and fully qualified, procedures for data acquisition to ensure accuracy and ¿fitness for purpose¿ of the terrestrial LIDAR data.

· Terrestrial LIDAR produces very large 3D ¿clouds of points¿ that are visually interesting but not immediately analyzable by traditional software products.

Objectives

This study will focus on the development and application of three-dimensional terrestrial LIDAR (Light Detecting And Ranging) technology for geotechnical applications affecting the construction and maintenance of highways. The objectives include:

a. Using three-dimensional information from a LIDAR survey to estimate dimensions and volumes at a site.

b. Using LIDAR surveys for rock mass site characterization.

c. Using successive LIDAR scans along with "change detection" algorithms to determine the location and rates of rockfall events at a site.

Scope of Work

1. Evaluate and assess the recommended field procedure for the scanning and rescanning of highway rock cuts developed by the currently funded FHWA study.

2. Field-test procedures and algorithms for the processing of laser scan data (point clouds) developed by the current Federal Highway Administration and National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) IDEA projects.

3. Evaluate the Integration of laser-scanned data into Rockfall Hazard Rating Systems.

4. Facilitate widespread systematic use of laser-scanned data by state transportation agencies.

5. Produce a draft ¿Recommended Practice¿ document for submission to and review by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation officials (AASHTO).

Comments

Minimum state commitment is $30,000 over two years ($15,000 per year)

No document attached.

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