High Speed Pavement Analyzer

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General Information
Solicitation Number: 1110
Status: End Solicitation Phase
Date Posted: Jun 13, 2006
Last Updated: Jun 29, 2006
Solicitation Expires: Sep 30, 2006
Partners: FHWA, IADOT
Lead Organization: Iowa Department of Transportation
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2007
Commitment End Year: 2007
100% SP&R Approval: Pending Approval
Commitments Required: $5,000.00
Commitments Received: $80,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Chris Brakke
chris.brakke@iowadot.us
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Suneel Vanikar
suneel.vanikar@fhwa.dot.gov
Phone: 202-366-0120
Organization Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
Federal Highway Administration 2007 $75,000.00 Thomas Van Thomas Van 202-366-1341 thomas.van@dot.gov
Iowa Department of Transportation 2007 $5,000.00 Chris Brakke Carol Culver 515-239-1208 carol.culver@iowadot.us

Background

Analysis of pavement distress and structural condition is a key component of all pavement management systems and provides a method to schedule rehabilitation and maintenance activities to minimize life-cycle costs for these facilities. In the analysis of existing PCC or composite pavements, the properties normally associated with structural condition include load transfer, cracking, and faulting. The current state-of-the-practice consists of obtaining cracking information by visual observation or using electronic image recognition methods. Visual observation is the most common method but it requires significant training to ensure consistency and accuracy and often subjects observers to traffic hazards. Electronic image recognition is a relatively new technology but has significant limitations. Measuring load transfer across joints is normally done using a Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) by loading one side of joint and reading deflection measurements from one or more sensors on each side. The method works but it is slow, requires lane closures, and exposes the FWD operators to traffic hazards. Faulting is usually measured using manual devices operated within the traffic lane ¿ again, exposing those making the measurements to traffic hazards. In all cases, these state-of-the-practice methods require lane closures and may create traffic delays.

At the network level, it is difficult to secure enough data about structural condition to be statistically significant. Pavement conditions change frequently due to irregularities in geology, materials used, and construction techniques. As a result, management systems frequently conduct analyses with insufficient structural information or without consideration of the structural conditions of the existing pavements.

Objectives

The long-term goal of this effort is to develop a device that will measure, at highway speeds, pavement structural condition which is known to impact the performance of PCC and composite pavements. Such a system needs to be able to process the collected measurements into an immediately usable form in near real-time. It is believed that the recent improvements in computers, laser measuring devices, and similar technologies will make the development of such a system possible. The goal of the work specifically described herein is to, in fact, determine if the required technologies exist and to what extent a market exists for such a device.

Scope of Work

The proposed research project will investigate the feasibility and practicality of developing a device for measuring the structural condition of PCC and composite pavements. There are two tasks in this project, Technical Feasibility Study and Utilization Study.

Comments

$5,000 per state requested

Documents Attached
Title File/Link Type Privacy Download
High Speed Pavement Analyzer 1110.pdf Solicitation Public

High Speed Pavement Analyzer

General Information
Solicitation Number: 1110
Status: End Solicitation Phase
Date Posted: Jun 13, 2006
Last Updated: Jun 29, 2006
Solicitation Expires: Sep 30, 2006
Partners: FHWA, IADOT
Lead Organization: Iowa Department of Transportation
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2007
Commitment End Year: 2007
100% SP&R Approval: Pending Approval
Commitments Required: $5,000.00
Commitments Received: $80,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Chris Brakke
chris.brakke@iowadot.us
FHWA Technical Liaison(s): Suneel Vanikar
suneel.vanikar@fhwa.dot.gov
Phone: 202-366-0120
Commitments by Organizations
Agency Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
Federal Highway Administration 2007 $75,000.00 Thomas Van Thomas Van 202-366-1341 thomas.van@dot.gov
Iowa Department of Transportation 2007 $5,000.00 Chris Brakke Carol Culver 515-239-1208 carol.culver@iowadot.us

Background

Analysis of pavement distress and structural condition is a key component of all pavement management systems and provides a method to schedule rehabilitation and maintenance activities to minimize life-cycle costs for these facilities. In the analysis of existing PCC or composite pavements, the properties normally associated with structural condition include load transfer, cracking, and faulting. The current state-of-the-practice consists of obtaining cracking information by visual observation or using electronic image recognition methods. Visual observation is the most common method but it requires significant training to ensure consistency and accuracy and often subjects observers to traffic hazards. Electronic image recognition is a relatively new technology but has significant limitations. Measuring load transfer across joints is normally done using a Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) by loading one side of joint and reading deflection measurements from one or more sensors on each side. The method works but it is slow, requires lane closures, and exposes the FWD operators to traffic hazards. Faulting is usually measured using manual devices operated within the traffic lane ¿ again, exposing those making the measurements to traffic hazards. In all cases, these state-of-the-practice methods require lane closures and may create traffic delays.

At the network level, it is difficult to secure enough data about structural condition to be statistically significant. Pavement conditions change frequently due to irregularities in geology, materials used, and construction techniques. As a result, management systems frequently conduct analyses with insufficient structural information or without consideration of the structural conditions of the existing pavements.

Objectives

The long-term goal of this effort is to develop a device that will measure, at highway speeds, pavement structural condition which is known to impact the performance of PCC and composite pavements. Such a system needs to be able to process the collected measurements into an immediately usable form in near real-time. It is believed that the recent improvements in computers, laser measuring devices, and similar technologies will make the development of such a system possible. The goal of the work specifically described herein is to, in fact, determine if the required technologies exist and to what extent a market exists for such a device.

Scope of Work

The proposed research project will investigate the feasibility and practicality of developing a device for measuring the structural condition of PCC and composite pavements. There are two tasks in this project, Technical Feasibility Study and Utilization Study.

Comments

$5,000 per state requested

Title Type Private
High Speed Pavement Analyzer Solicitation N

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