Design and Construction Guidelines for Thermally Insulated Concrete Pavements (MnROAD Study)

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General Information
Solicitation Number: 1058
Status: End Solicitation Phase
Date Posted: Jan 11, 2006
Last Updated: Jul 03, 2013
Solicitation Expires: Dec 31, 2006
Partners: CA, FHWA, Local Road Research Board (LRRB), MN, WA
Lead Organization: Minnesota Department of Transportation
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2007
Commitment End Year: 2012
100% SP&R Approval: Pending Approval
Commitments Required: $450,000.00
Commitments Received: $455,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Tim Clyne
tim.clyne@state.mn.us
Organization Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
California Department of Transportation 2007 $20,000.00 Michael Samadian Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
California Department of Transportation 2008 $20,000.00 Michael Samadian Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
California Department of Transportation 2009 $20,000.00 Michael Samadian Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
California Department of Transportation 2010 $20,000.00 Michael Samadian Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
California Department of Transportation 2011 $20,000.00 Michael Samadian Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
Federal Highway Administration 2007 $100,000.00 Nadarajah Sivaneswaran Jean Landolt 202-493-3146 Jean.Landolt@dot.gov
Federal Highway Administration 2008 $100,000.00 Nadarajah Sivaneswaran Jean Landolt 202-493-3146 Jean.Landolt@dot.gov
Local Road Research Board 2007 $50,000.00 Lisa Jansen Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2007 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2008 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2009 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2010 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2011 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Washington State Department of Transportation 2007 $5,000.00 Jeff Uhlmeyer Kim Willoughby 360-705-7978 willouk@wsdot.wa.gov

Background

Thermally insulated concrete pavements consist of a concrete pavement structure (jointed or continuously reinforced) covered by an asphalt layer during construction (before opening to traffic) or soon after construction to address ride quality or surface characteristic issues. The reverse process of constructing concrete over an asphalt pavement is called whitetopping, and it will be considered in other projects outside of this study. Thin asphalt overlays encompass many of the same ideas as TICPs, and they will also be considered in this pooled fund study.

TICPs combine the structural longevity of PCC pavements with the serviceability of HMA pavements. One of the perceived benefits of TICPs is the simplification of the PCC design and construction through a thinner PCC layer, simplified finishing, and simplified joint formation techniques.

There is a need for effective design and construction guidelines for TICPs. These guidelines should be based on a better understanding of the effects of design, materials, and construction parameters on the performance of the TICPs. The research proposed in this pooled fund study aims to develop such guidelines for mechanistic design and construction. The study will require extensive field performance data as validation of the design process.

Several TICP sections will be constructed at MnROAD and their performance will be compared with the performance of adjacent concrete and asphalt pavements. The following issues will be addressed:

¿ Degree of composite action (bond) of PCC and HMA layers

¿ Thermal blanket effect of the HMA layer on the PCC layer

¿ Development of cracking in the PCC layer

¿ Development of reflective cracking and rutting in the HMA layer

¿ Degree of reduction in roughness

¿ Criteria for applicability of TICP for existing rigid pavements

The performance of the HMA surface in a TICP is largely dictated by conflicting factors, namely the rut resistance and reflection cracking potential of the HMA mixture. The correct balance is influenced not only by the mixture and binder type but also by the underlying pavement type and condition and environmental conditions. Several laboratory testing devices, such as the Asphalt Pavement Analyzer, Hamburg Wheel Tracking Device, Simple Shear Tester, and the Simple Performance Tester, have been implemented to design mixes resistant to rutting. The TTI Overlay Tester has recently been developed by TxDOT to characterize the reflective cracking resistance of HMA, and it could be of great use in this project.

Related studies include:

¿ TPF 962: Pavement Surface Properties Consortium: A Research Program (Virginia)

¿ NCHRP 1-43: Guide for Pavement Friction (ERES)

¿ NCHRP 1-41: Models for Predicting Reflection Cracking of Hot-Mix Asphalt Overlays (Texas A&M)

¿ TxDOT 0-4398: Develop Guidelines for Designing and Constructing Thin Asphalt Pavement (ACP) Overlays on Continuous Reinforcement Concrete Pavements (University of Texas)

¿ TxDOT 0-4517: Develop Statewide Recommendations for Application of PCC Joint Reflective Cracking Rehabilitation Strategies Considering Lufkin District Experience (Texas Transportation Institute)

¿ TxDOT 0-4467: Developing an Upgraded Overlay Tester System to Characterize the Reflection Cracking Resistance of Asphalt Concrete (Texas Transportation Institute)

¿ Calibration of Mechanistic-Empirical Design Procedures using the Heavy Vehicle Simulator (University of California Pavement Research Center)

This research will help broaden the application of mechanistic-empirical pavement design methods to the use of TICPs. Several previous studies have focused on noise and ride characteristics of TICPs and thin HMA overlays. This pooled fund study is aimed primarily at the structural design of such pavements.

Objectives

The main objective of the proposed research is to develop design and construction guidelines for thermally insulated concrete pavements (TICP), i.e. composite thin HMA overlays of new or structurally sound existing PCC pavements. A secondary objective is to develop recommendations for feasibility analysis of newly constructed TICP or thin overlays of the existing concrete pavements. These objectives would be accomplished by collecting field performance data and evaluating the influence of design, material properties, and construction on the performance of TICP.

Specific objectives include:

¿ Determine benefits of HMA layer on curling and warping potential of concrete panels

¿ Develop a life cycle cost analysis-based guidelines for determination of economic feasibility of TICPs and thin AC overlays considering both agency and user costs.

¿ Incorporate the results into design and construction guidelines. Also, provide recommendations on where TICPs are most effective.

¿ Evaluate how construction processes can be modified to take advantage of the TICP design

o Profile control (ride is achieved with the HMA layers)

o Required cure time before the HMA can be placed

o Joint forming versus sawing

o Roller compacted techniques

o CRCP techniques

¿ Predict extension of the fatigue life of the TICP vs. PCC pavement

¿ Evaluate the service life of the thin HMA overlay.

¿ Characterize initial and long term bond at the interface between the layers

¿ Determine the optimum thickness ratio of the two layers based on load and environmental conditions

¿ Optimize layer stiffness

¿ Select optimum pavement panel size/joint spacing for jointed designs

¿ Identify drainage needs based on degree of initial bond and potential degradation of bond with time

A portion of this project involves constructing new test sections at the Minnesota Road Research Facility (MnROAD) to study TICPs. The funding for initial construction of the test sections will be obtained separately from Mn/DOT and other partners. This proposed pooled fund study is strictly to perform the research on newly built TICP test sections at MnROAD and elsewhere, and its funding will come from Mn/DOT and other participating states.

Scope of Work

This proposal for the thermally insulated concrete pavement design study was driven by the 4-State Pavement Technology Consortium and formed by three key research participants, who are expected to perform the research set forth in this proposal:

¿ Lev Khazanovich, University of Minnesota (Structural Design)

¿ John Harvey, University of California Pavement Research Center (Crack Reflectance and HMA Characterization)

¿ Joe Mahoney, University of Washington (Database Assembly)

The work plan for this pooled fund study will be developed by the participating organizations. To accomplish the objectives of this research, the following tasks are proposed:

Task 1: Development of Information on TICPs

This task includes the development of a composite pavements synthesis for FHWA as part of the literature review that will not only cover the use, design, construction, and performance "Thermally Insulated Concrete Pavements", which is the focus of this study, but also traditional composite pavements resulting from rehabilitation. A survey will also be distributed to state DOTs for their experience using TICPs. The material properties of each layer will be measured in the laboratory. A plan will be developed for characterization of the existing PCC pavements.

Task 2: Perform Initial Life-Cycle Cost Analysis

A life cycle cost analysis will be performed, taking into account agency and user costs. This analysis will compare several hypothetical TICPs and overlays with conventional asphalt and concrete pavements to determine economically viable solutions.

Task 3: Environmental and Traffic Load Responses

Researchers will investigate the effect of various TICP designs on the reduction of PCC slab curling and joint movements due to presence of the HMA layer. Critical design, material, and construction features will be identified.

Task 4: Selection of Field Sections for Evaluation

The information obtained in the surveys conducted in Task 1 will be used to select field pavement test sections from existing pavements around the United States. The test sections would include combinations of layer thickness, panel size, and layer moduli.

Task 5: Field Test Section Testing and Surveys

Researchers will coordinate the field work to be conducted by the agency with jurisdiction. Field monitoring and testing activities will include condition surveys, pavement profile, deflection testing, and material sampling.

Task 6: Evaluation of Pavement Response Models and the M-EPDG

Researchers will develop and/or evaluate existing computer models capable of predicting pavement response to load and environmental effects. The data developed in the above tasks will be used to validate the PCC models in the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) or other models.

Task 7: TICP Design and Construction Guidelines

A draft of design and construction guidelines will be developed for TICPs. An experimental design for verification of the guidelines will be developed that can be constructed at MnROAD or other test facilities. A life cycle cost analysis will also be performed.

Task 8: Final Stage I Report

A draft final report will be produced and presented to the TAP for review.

Task 9: Construction and Monitoring of Field Validation Sections

Two test sections will be instrumented and constructed at MnROAD ¿ a new TICP and an HMA overlay of an existing PCC pavement. MnROAD test sections would allow the detailed measurement of pavement responses to load and environmental effects.

Task 10: Final Revisions to the TICP Design

The design and constriction guidelines will be revised based on the results of the full-scale tests conducted at MnROAD and/or other locations.

A detailed version of this pooled fund proposal is available on the MnROAD website at http://www.mnroad.dot.state.mn.us/research/Construction/2007mnroad/Composite.pdf.

Comments

Mn/DOT along with other participating states are asked to contribute $20,000 per year for 5 years to fund the research proposed in this pooled fund study.

The Minnesota Department of Transportation (as the lead agency) along with other partners will provide approximately $200,000 in construction funding outside of this pooled fund study to construct the pavement test sections at MnROAD for validating the design and construction guidelines for composite pavements and thin HMA overlays.

Documents Attached
Title File/Link Type Privacy Download
Design and Construction Guidelines for Thermally Insulated Concrete Pavements (MnROAD Study) http://www.mnroad.dot.state.mn.us/research/Construction/2007mnroad/Mnroad2005.pdf Solicitation Public

Design and Construction Guidelines for Thermally Insulated Concrete Pavements (MnROAD Study)

General Information
Solicitation Number: 1058
Status: End Solicitation Phase
Date Posted: Jan 11, 2006
Last Updated: Jul 03, 2013
Solicitation Expires: Dec 31, 2006
Partners: CA, FHWA, Local Road Research Board (LRRB), MN, WA
Lead Organization: Minnesota Department of Transportation
Financial Summary
Commitment Start Year: 2007
Commitment End Year: 2012
100% SP&R Approval: Pending Approval
Commitments Required: $450,000.00
Commitments Received: $455,000.00
Contact Information
Lead Study Contact(s): Tim Clyne
tim.clyne@state.mn.us
Commitments by Organizations
Agency Year Commitments Technical Contact Name Funding Contact Name Contact Number Email Address
California Department of Transportation 2007 $20,000.00 Michael Samadian Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
California Department of Transportation 2008 $20,000.00 Michael Samadian Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
California Department of Transportation 2009 $20,000.00 Michael Samadian Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
California Department of Transportation 2010 $20,000.00 Michael Samadian Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
California Department of Transportation 2011 $20,000.00 Michael Samadian Sang Le 916-227-0701 sang.le@dot.ca.gov
Federal Highway Administration 2007 $100,000.00 Nadarajah Sivaneswaran Jean Landolt 202-493-3146 Jean.Landolt@dot.gov
Federal Highway Administration 2008 $100,000.00 Nadarajah Sivaneswaran Jean Landolt 202-493-3146 Jean.Landolt@dot.gov
Local Road Research Board 2007 $50,000.00 Lisa Jansen Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2007 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2008 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2009 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2010 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Minnesota Department of Transportation 2011 $20,000.00 Lisa Jansen 651-366-3779 lisa.jansen@state.mn.us
Washington State Department of Transportation 2007 $5,000.00 Jeff Uhlmeyer Kim Willoughby 360-705-7978 willouk@wsdot.wa.gov

Background

Thermally insulated concrete pavements consist of a concrete pavement structure (jointed or continuously reinforced) covered by an asphalt layer during construction (before opening to traffic) or soon after construction to address ride quality or surface characteristic issues. The reverse process of constructing concrete over an asphalt pavement is called whitetopping, and it will be considered in other projects outside of this study. Thin asphalt overlays encompass many of the same ideas as TICPs, and they will also be considered in this pooled fund study.

TICPs combine the structural longevity of PCC pavements with the serviceability of HMA pavements. One of the perceived benefits of TICPs is the simplification of the PCC design and construction through a thinner PCC layer, simplified finishing, and simplified joint formation techniques.

There is a need for effective design and construction guidelines for TICPs. These guidelines should be based on a better understanding of the effects of design, materials, and construction parameters on the performance of the TICPs. The research proposed in this pooled fund study aims to develop such guidelines for mechanistic design and construction. The study will require extensive field performance data as validation of the design process.

Several TICP sections will be constructed at MnROAD and their performance will be compared with the performance of adjacent concrete and asphalt pavements. The following issues will be addressed:

¿ Degree of composite action (bond) of PCC and HMA layers

¿ Thermal blanket effect of the HMA layer on the PCC layer

¿ Development of cracking in the PCC layer

¿ Development of reflective cracking and rutting in the HMA layer

¿ Degree of reduction in roughness

¿ Criteria for applicability of TICP for existing rigid pavements

The performance of the HMA surface in a TICP is largely dictated by conflicting factors, namely the rut resistance and reflection cracking potential of the HMA mixture. The correct balance is influenced not only by the mixture and binder type but also by the underlying pavement type and condition and environmental conditions. Several laboratory testing devices, such as the Asphalt Pavement Analyzer, Hamburg Wheel Tracking Device, Simple Shear Tester, and the Simple Performance Tester, have been implemented to design mixes resistant to rutting. The TTI Overlay Tester has recently been developed by TxDOT to characterize the reflective cracking resistance of HMA, and it could be of great use in this project.

Related studies include:

¿ TPF 962: Pavement Surface Properties Consortium: A Research Program (Virginia)

¿ NCHRP 1-43: Guide for Pavement Friction (ERES)

¿ NCHRP 1-41: Models for Predicting Reflection Cracking of Hot-Mix Asphalt Overlays (Texas A&M)

¿ TxDOT 0-4398: Develop Guidelines for Designing and Constructing Thin Asphalt Pavement (ACP) Overlays on Continuous Reinforcement Concrete Pavements (University of Texas)

¿ TxDOT 0-4517: Develop Statewide Recommendations for Application of PCC Joint Reflective Cracking Rehabilitation Strategies Considering Lufkin District Experience (Texas Transportation Institute)

¿ TxDOT 0-4467: Developing an Upgraded Overlay Tester System to Characterize the Reflection Cracking Resistance of Asphalt Concrete (Texas Transportation Institute)

¿ Calibration of Mechanistic-Empirical Design Procedures using the Heavy Vehicle Simulator (University of California Pavement Research Center)

This research will help broaden the application of mechanistic-empirical pavement design methods to the use of TICPs. Several previous studies have focused on noise and ride characteristics of TICPs and thin HMA overlays. This pooled fund study is aimed primarily at the structural design of such pavements.

Objectives

The main objective of the proposed research is to develop design and construction guidelines for thermally insulated concrete pavements (TICP), i.e. composite thin HMA overlays of new or structurally sound existing PCC pavements. A secondary objective is to develop recommendations for feasibility analysis of newly constructed TICP or thin overlays of the existing concrete pavements. These objectives would be accomplished by collecting field performance data and evaluating the influence of design, material properties, and construction on the performance of TICP.

Specific objectives include:

¿ Determine benefits of HMA layer on curling and warping potential of concrete panels

¿ Develop a life cycle cost analysis-based guidelines for determination of economic feasibility of TICPs and thin AC overlays considering both agency and user costs.

¿ Incorporate the results into design and construction guidelines. Also, provide recommendations on where TICPs are most effective.

¿ Evaluate how construction processes can be modified to take advantage of the TICP design

o Profile control (ride is achieved with the HMA layers)

o Required cure time before the HMA can be placed

o Joint forming versus sawing

o Roller compacted techniques

o CRCP techniques

¿ Predict extension of the fatigue life of the TICP vs. PCC pavement

¿ Evaluate the service life of the thin HMA overlay.

¿ Characterize initial and long term bond at the interface between the layers

¿ Determine the optimum thickness ratio of the two layers based on load and environmental conditions

¿ Optimize layer stiffness

¿ Select optimum pavement panel size/joint spacing for jointed designs

¿ Identify drainage needs based on degree of initial bond and potential degradation of bond with time

A portion of this project involves constructing new test sections at the Minnesota Road Research Facility (MnROAD) to study TICPs. The funding for initial construction of the test sections will be obtained separately from Mn/DOT and other partners. This proposed pooled fund study is strictly to perform the research on newly built TICP test sections at MnROAD and elsewhere, and its funding will come from Mn/DOT and other participating states.

Scope of Work

This proposal for the thermally insulated concrete pavement design study was driven by the 4-State Pavement Technology Consortium and formed by three key research participants, who are expected to perform the research set forth in this proposal:

¿ Lev Khazanovich, University of Minnesota (Structural Design)

¿ John Harvey, University of California Pavement Research Center (Crack Reflectance and HMA Characterization)

¿ Joe Mahoney, University of Washington (Database Assembly)

The work plan for this pooled fund study will be developed by the participating organizations. To accomplish the objectives of this research, the following tasks are proposed:

Task 1: Development of Information on TICPs

This task includes the development of a composite pavements synthesis for FHWA as part of the literature review that will not only cover the use, design, construction, and performance "Thermally Insulated Concrete Pavements", which is the focus of this study, but also traditional composite pavements resulting from rehabilitation. A survey will also be distributed to state DOTs for their experience using TICPs. The material properties of each layer will be measured in the laboratory. A plan will be developed for characterization of the existing PCC pavements.

Task 2: Perform Initial Life-Cycle Cost Analysis

A life cycle cost analysis will be performed, taking into account agency and user costs. This analysis will compare several hypothetical TICPs and overlays with conventional asphalt and concrete pavements to determine economically viable solutions.

Task 3: Environmental and Traffic Load Responses

Researchers will investigate the effect of various TICP designs on the reduction of PCC slab curling and joint movements due to presence of the HMA layer. Critical design, material, and construction features will be identified.

Task 4: Selection of Field Sections for Evaluation

The information obtained in the surveys conducted in Task 1 will be used to select field pavement test sections from existing pavements around the United States. The test sections would include combinations of layer thickness, panel size, and layer moduli.

Task 5: Field Test Section Testing and Surveys

Researchers will coordinate the field work to be conducted by the agency with jurisdiction. Field monitoring and testing activities will include condition surveys, pavement profile, deflection testing, and material sampling.

Task 6: Evaluation of Pavement Response Models and the M-EPDG

Researchers will develop and/or evaluate existing computer models capable of predicting pavement response to load and environmental effects. The data developed in the above tasks will be used to validate the PCC models in the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) or other models.

Task 7: TICP Design and Construction Guidelines

A draft of design and construction guidelines will be developed for TICPs. An experimental design for verification of the guidelines will be developed that can be constructed at MnROAD or other test facilities. A life cycle cost analysis will also be performed.

Task 8: Final Stage I Report

A draft final report will be produced and presented to the TAP for review.

Task 9: Construction and Monitoring of Field Validation Sections

Two test sections will be instrumented and constructed at MnROAD ¿ a new TICP and an HMA overlay of an existing PCC pavement. MnROAD test sections would allow the detailed measurement of pavement responses to load and environmental effects.

Task 10: Final Revisions to the TICP Design

The design and constriction guidelines will be revised based on the results of the full-scale tests conducted at MnROAD and/or other locations.

A detailed version of this pooled fund proposal is available on the MnROAD website at http://www.mnroad.dot.state.mn.us/research/Construction/2007mnroad/Composite.pdf.

Comments

Mn/DOT along with other participating states are asked to contribute $20,000 per year for 5 years to fund the research proposed in this pooled fund study.

The Minnesota Department of Transportation (as the lead agency) along with other partners will provide approximately $200,000 in construction funding outside of this pooled fund study to construct the pavement test sections at MnROAD for validating the design and construction guidelines for composite pavements and thin HMA overlays.

Title Type Private
Design and Construction Guidelines for Thermally Insulated Concrete Pavements (MnROAD Study) Solicitation N

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